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Sega’s Chief Operating Officer, Shuji Utsumi, recently conveyed optimism about the prospects of blockchain gaming and the potential role that Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) may play in shaping the future of video games. This positive outlook comes despite his prior statement to Bloomberg, just a few months ago, where he expressed his view that play-to-earn games were “boring.”

Utsumi’s statements emerged during an interview, initially published as a sponsored article by Dengeki Online a few weeks ago and subsequently translated into a blog post. The Co-COO’s perspective is part of a broader discussion surrounding Sega’s recent licensing arrangement.

Shuji Utsumi Discusses Sega’s Licensing Deal and the Future of Player Ownership

In his discussion, Utsumi mentioned, “Within blockchain games, owning assets and, in some cases, earning money could become player wants that haven’t existed before.” This outlook reflects the shifting landscape in the gaming industry, where blockchain technology and NFTs are opening up new avenues for player engagement and asset ownership.

Sega, known for iconic titles like Sonic the Hedgehog, has licensed its Sangokushi Taisen card game’s intellectual property to the blockchain firm Double Jump.Tokyo. This partnership aims to create a brand-new trading card game (TCG) called “Battle of Three Kingdoms,” featuring NFT cards inspired by the original 2005 game. Utsumi’s remarks are intricately linked to this licensing arrangement and its potential implications.

The new Sega-licensed TCG, “Battle of Three Kingdoms,” is geared towards the Asian gaming market. It is expected to include more than a hundred unique cards and will receive ongoing support in the form of game patches and upgrades after its initial release. This endeavor reflects Sega’s commitment to revitalizing the old game’s intellectual property while safeguarding its core elements.

According to Utsumi, the development of “Battle of Three Kingdoms” will be led by the original Sangokushi Taisen game’s producer, ensuring the preservation of the game’s essence and spirit. Sega will also contribute game materials to enrich the project. Utsumi described this partnership as a “win-win” situation for both parties, emphasizing Sega’s opportunity to gain valuable insights into the burgeoning realm of blockchain games.

In conclusion, Shuji Utsumi’s optimism regarding blockchain gaming and the potential of NFTs in the industry signals a noteworthy shift in Sega’s strategy. The licensing of their classic IP for the creation of “Battle of Three Kingdoms” not only represents a commitment to preserving nostalgia but also signifies Sega’s forward-looking approach to exploring the evolving landscape of blockchain-based gaming experiences.